Bric, Luggage, Photography, Plymouth, Devon, Travel

Bespoke Product Photography

Recently at Clash & Clash Photography we had the privilege to shoot again for Bric Luggage, providing them with top quality imagery to be used in the latest publication of ‘Cruise International’. The images we provided are to be used to promote a competition in which the luggage set we photographed is the prize.

Bric, Luggage, Photography, Plymouth, Devon, Travel

Know your customer

The brief was pretty open (but not wide open) and with the client being a regular user of our services, we are often trusted with assessing a product(s) and matching their product to a photographic style that fits their companies ethos. We visually represent through our work, images that are suitable and fitting to the brands identity. The job was to provide them with striking images that engage the reader to want to put themselves forward for the opportunity of winning something they desire, not to completely reinvent how Bric is represented through photography.

Make it interesting

The feeling that product photography could be perceived as mechanical to the aspiring university student, and can often spill into the professional world. Sometimes this attitude can result negatively in how products are represented in photographs. But why should you put less effort into imagery for something seen as ‘everyday’, why shouldn’t a crisp packet not be photographed as enigmatically as high end and fashionable Luggage. At Clash & Clash we feel it is best to place a product in it’s best possible light (so to speak) no matter the subject. Shoot more angles, take more images than you need, enjoy your job.

product, photography, Devon, Plymouth, studio

Over-deliver

Providing a client with more photographic options could be seen as a waste of time, expending more effort on what may not be needed. It is by no means a waste of time, it is important, it makes the client feel valued. If you are charging the client on a time basis, make sure they are aware of your intentions to provide them with more options. Before you start the work avoid saying “it’s going to cost you more”, build up a rapport with your clients, earn their trust. Try suggesting “I’ve had a great idea for the product, are you okay with me shooting a few different options” don’t just wade in and send an invoice across, remember you don’t have to edit every single image you take so your only spending time on the capture not on the post processing. The most important thing to remember is that you are confident and honest in your intentions and by providing more options that the ideas will genuinely help the client’s brand image. If you send across 15 options where all you have done is move the camera slightly this is not being honest, reset the products and start again, change the lighting, think about what you are aiming to relay in the images and why it will be relevant to the brand or the purpose of the images you have been commissioned to provide.

Thanks for reading.

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